Buy Me a Beer

Here's where I shamelessly beg for patronage. If you like what I'm doing, I dunno, maybe buy me a beer? I need your shares and tweets too! Thanks for reading.

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The debate over public sector unions and their "underfunded pension liabilities" has consistently failed to mention key information regarding the causes of the pension fund problems. Try to remember that it's almost entirely due to the scams surrounding the financial collapse of 2008. Wall street stole from us all, now the media machine and big business want to kick us while we're down.

Compiling a list of the 10 Worst Wall Street Actions of 2013 should be easy – there are so many to choose from! The problem is, it often takes years to see which financial activities and innovations have been the most destructive and destabilizing. Therefore, the following should be considered merely a sample of the ways Wall Street has maneuvered, manipulated, defrauded and deceived people during the past year.

If you've ever been arrested on a drug charge, if you've ever spent even a day in jail for having a stem of marijuana in your pocket or "drug paraphernalia" in your gym bag, Assistant Attorney General and longtime Bill Clinton pal Lanny Breuer has a message for you: Bite me.

To hear the number $13 billion dollars as a fine in the much-leaked-but-finally-announced Department of Justice (DOJ) settlement with JPMorgan Chase is meant to imply that the DOJ is getting tough on Wall Street. After all, $13 billion dollars is a jaw-dropping pile of money.

The head of the Federal Reserve Bank of New York said Thursday that some of America’s largest financial institutions appear to lack respect for the law, a potentially explosive charge against an industry already roiling from numerous government investigations into alleged wrongdoing.

Feeling generous? You should because you are about to help pay for JPMorgan’s $13 billion fine for causing the 2008 financial crisis. According to tax experts the money JPMorgan will be paying to the government ($9 billion) and to wronged customers ($4 billion) can be written off as a “business expense.” In other words, JPMorgan may be sticking the taxpayers with the bill.