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A petition to the Securities and Exchange Commission to require more sunlight around corporate political spending has garnered hundreds of thousands of public comments, and almost all of them are in support of the rule change. Of the 643,599 public comments on the proposal to require that public companies disclose use of corporate resources for political activities to shareholders, more than 99.7 percent were in support of such a rule.

WE NEED CITIZEN-FUNDED ELECTIONS

Today the Supreme Court is hearing a critical case called McCutcheon v. FEC. In its McCutcheon ruling, the Court could undermine the aggregate limits on how much money a donor can give to candidates each cycle -- and the Court could even remove limits on the size of individual contributions to candidates altogether!

Bill Moyers' Money & Politics

Do democracy and plutocracy mix? Bill Moyers has spent years digging into the corrosive effects of money and corporate influence on American politics, a well-traveled intersection that has become all the more significant in the aftermath of the 2010 Supreme Court’s Citizens United ruling. How far back does the influence go and how much does it corrupt our democracy today? Explore these current issues with help from leading thinkers, investigative journalists and scholars.

Shaun McCutcheon, the lead plaintiff in a high-profile campaign finance challenge the U.S. Supreme Court will soon consider, made an excessive contribution to the Alabama Republican Party’s federal political committee last year, records show.

Fireworks really start at 12:48 when Elizabeth Warren makes her speech. Larry does not disappoint, either at 22:51.

An Alabama businessman and the Republican National Committee want the Supreme Court to throw out “aggregate contribution limits.” The case is called McCutcheon v. FEC.